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Discussion Board conversations on Public Art
After viewing slides provided by Harold Beaulieu, Vallejo Muralist
Author: Masomi  Mrema
Date: Saturday, October 22, 2011 3:02:18 AM EDT
Subject: What is the point of public art? 
Public art can heighten economic value. Data strongly suggests that cities with an active and dynamic cultural scene are more attractive to individuals and businesses. This is evident in some cities in the bay area such as Oakland and San Francisco. These cities have more people and business than others in the bay area because of  the aesthetic value of  public art. Some of these pieces of art reflect lives, cultures, and beliefs of people in the communities. As the result, more and more people are relocating to such cities because they feel a sense of belonging.
Public art engages people in social interaction. Strangers would engage in conversation; children would ask questions. It becomes a place that we can educate each other, and enhance our knowledge, learning new things and passing on to the next generation.
Public art offers peace in community. there are some cities that have past history of violence. By embedding a piece of art, that delineate piece, can help to reduce violence and make people feel calmer and more relaxed.

Response:

Masomi’s perspective on what is the point of public art is interesting and true. Cities that embrace art as a part of their image are viewed by surrounding cities as progressive, liberal and urbane.  A city with this type of brand image typically attracts people who are culturally diverse and engenders pride in the residents. I agree with Masomi, public art can bring to a city a sense of belonging and community. 

Author: Karen Gong
Date: Thursday, October 20, 2011 5:22:49 PM EDT
Subject: Slideshow discussion essay 
What is public art? Is it art or is it creativity? What is the point of public art?
Public art to me is the community’s creative expressions. I found this quote and I agree with the point of view. "If done right, public art creates a sense of commonality for a community; pride and ownership of the neighborhood, cohesion of purpose and a starting point to join together to address larger issues. (Art) creates shared public space/experience."
When I looked through Harold Beaulieu’s slide show, I saw a theme of shared community and experience. There were numerous murals shown and I imagined many people contributing to them. The stories he related of how a town painted a mural in a day reminded me of that. I loved seeing the school murals with the kids modeling their silhouettes.
I laughed at seeing the monasteries built on a mountain. I had never thought of these as public pieces of art. My parents visited these medieval monasteries in Europe and brought  back books and pictures of them. They were beautiful and fascinating places. In order to enter some of these monasteries, one had to be transported in a pulley system. It’s function was to protect the inhabitants from invaders.  The functionality of the place made for a beautiful form. It got me to thinking of buildings, bridges and architecture as art pieces. They are not only beautiful but each serve a purpose, to shelter, connect, and structurally hold a place up.
Art is creativity. It makes us think beyond the physical and gives meaning and depth to our imagination. There was a mural of a man with a bandanna who seemed to be throwing a Molotov cocktail to start a fire in a building or store. The cocktail was replaced with a bouquet of flowers. This affected me so much. Imagine if the spread of violence was exchanged with the spread of peace and love. It sounds corny but, that image expanded my mind in that direction. It was both quiet and disturbing. The image expressed this deep meaning to me better than any person’s words.
Karen Gong 10/19/11
Karen,
I can definitely relate to what you said about the image being both "quiet and disturbing". I think that often, art has a pulse that words cannot find.  As in the work you described, art can have the effect of spurring us to action and bettering us in many ways, without speaking a single word. Art shows us wrong and right at once and confronts us with a choice. No matter what we choose, art remains and remind us that there are greater implications of the things we do.


Author: Erin O'Brien
Date: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 10:07:57 PM EDT
Subject: What is the point of public art? 
Throughout the body of work presented in Harold's cd, the common thread uniting all public art seemed invariably to be its purpose. Public art is fundamentally by the people and for the people. Its concept is unique in that it is put forth according to the needs of expression felt by a particular community at a particular time. Public art marks social progress, but individual progress as well. Present in many of the works presented by Harold was an overwhelming sentiment that one individual's decisions can impact an entire community. Public art magnifies the responsibility that communities have to one another, and to themselves. Public art is a report on the health of any given community at any given time. In our communities, the voice that is spoken by many yet heard by few is prominently displayed in public art.
Public art is the proverbial watchdog that reminds us our acts are not unnoticed. Public art is the community guardian silently sanctioning poor behavior and holdig up those who do right. In many ways public art may be a public ideal; what we hope to be and what we strive to perpetuate seem omnipresent in public art. Public art is what we know our communities are capable of. Sometimes they're capable of good, other times they're capable of bad.
It is my impression that public art is a way to forever publish and encapsulate a given period in time. It is a fingerprint of all that we took pride in, all that we accomplished, and all that we hoped for. Public art in the present gives us something to reach for, public art in the future gives us something to remember by.
Importantly, public art is a way to bring communities together. Communities may initially unite in an evaluative spirit; determining the myriad ways that they are. This initial evaluation, this exercise, is the powerful spirit behind public art. Public art moves us because it is not from a single artist; it is many voices speaking as one. Therefore public art seems to compel us to greater social responsibility.
One of my favorite works from this collection was a wonderful mural, the text of which read: "Fix our eyes, not on what is seen but what is unseen, for what is seen is temporary... but what is unseen, eternal."
The message here is empowering, compelling. It is evident to me that this art is a guardian for the community in which it is displayed. Those who do wrong can take meaning from it. Those who do right can take meaning from it. Those who are silent victims can certainly take meaning from it, and indeed, refuge. Public art is at once a celebration of a community's good and a commitment to eradicating a community's bad. It is a policing power as much as it is a statement of worth and purpose. And that is the point, or purpose.
I agree with what you have said about public art : " public art is the way to bring people together". Since people are coming from different backgrounds, public art can be used to educate communities about other cultures, food, language, and more. If people, from different background, learn from each from each other, they would feel comfortable amid each other.

Response
I agree that art marks a space in time and records our accomplishments and hopes. I like the image you mentioned about many voices speaking as one.
The text you mentioned what is unseen being eternal is part of my favorite bible verse.
The last message you mentioned that art is very subjective and has different meaning to different people is very true. The same piece can inspire, console, and disturb. Art is very powerful that way
Author: Katharine Jolda
Date: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 8:19:50 PM EDT
Subject: art and creativity 
Traveling around the country, I have encountered a huge range of public art. There are the famous Alexander Calder and Marc Chagall creations in Chicago, wild graffiti on trains and subway cars, passionately painted murals along alleyways, whimsical knitwear for bike racks and stop signs, and  mythic and patriotic beings cast in bronze.
I believe art and creativity have the same roots. One can look into the etymology and find root associations of the making of something by skill and craft. We use “creative” in a funny way: He is so creative. Create-ive, to mean something like “uniquely expressive.”
 We create things all the time without being mindful of it, so art may be “skillful expression done with self-awareness” and the intention of communicating something to others. These days, arts seems to refer to increasingly conceptual creative work, whereas in earlier eras art was more skill-based and, in classical European fine arts, representative of the events of the time.
 Another change from earlier eras to contemporary art has been the concept of individuality in expression. Perhaps people feel strong urges to declare their unique identity as a contrast to a growing and broadening social group wherein individual relationships are easily overwhelmed by representative and group dynamics. It is striking to go to an exhibition of ancient art and see so many works from an ethnic group or a nation, and though the works were individually made by different people, the style can be exactly the same. First it is “Japanese watercolor from the 17th century” or a “traditional Navajo rug;” later we know the artists to be Yojo and Roberta Blackgoat.
 This movement of individuality has parallels with public murals, as those often mark the presence of a community that is not well represented in dominant public spheres or policy values. Municipally sponsored public art often goes through a long process of collaboration, design, and approval by all community stakeholders. While this is done with good intentions, this can lead to the illusion that we should always seek consensus, which is increasingly difficult as the community grows in number. I believe art should be a non-verbal dialog, each creation as a statement or rebuttal, and we should not expect one piece to summarize the whole.
 I like public art that tells a story of its place and provides an opportunity for people to feel part of that story. One of my favorite childhood memories is of a large mural under a freeway overpass that had the images of dozens of Oakland’s citizen heroes. My parents took care to know each person represented in this mural, and each time we walked past it, they would tell my sister and me about one of the people there
Wow Katharine, I'm impressed with your thorough description of art and creativity. Interesting point about illusion of consensus.  I like that you said it's important for us to remember that one piece cannot represent or summarize the whole.

Subject: RE: art and creativity    

Katherine, I do also like a public art that tells a story of its place! I grew up in a place surrounded with arts. You could not pass a mile without seeing a piece of art. I remember we used to travel periodically to my mother's and my father's village. There was a piece of public art in every town of each village. Each village had at least ten tribes. And each tribe spoke different dialect. The only way you could learn about each tribe was through a piece of  public art. These pieces public arts were very informative. They depict the history of the place, the culture, religion and, dialect. Consequently, people who visits villages can learn a lot about the villagers via their public art.


Author: Daisy Wiener
Date: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 2:41:23 PM EDT
Subject: What is the point of public art? 

Public art can take numerous forms and can be truly any size from something on the top of a pin to a piece of work that spans for miles.  I remember when I was young and living in rural Sonoma County that there was this white fence made out of material that an artist had done and it went on and on. I think it spanned across many counties but it was a long time ago so I can't remember exactly . I do remember this white flowing fence going across fields and up and over the hills and valleys, it was really cool looking.  I think that same artist did many huge pieces of art including wrapping some islands in the tropics with pink material, making them look like enormous lily pads. I'm a big fan of public art because it gives people something to think about.  I especially love street art like graffiti and pieces placed in random places.  I live in Petaluma and a couple years ago there were little old fashioned cars that were auctioned off for a fundraiser that people painted anyway they wanted and then they were placed in different places in town, very cute.  I love the hearts in San Francisco. They were also used as a fund raiser and they are these big ceramic hearts that are placed throughout the city that people painted in all kinds of ways. I love that public art is just that, art out in public made for all to see.  It's a beautiful thing and we are all lucky to get ideas and be inspired by others work.
My imagination is activated by the image Daisy paints with her first sentence “public art can take numerous forms and can be truly any size from something on the top of a pin to a piece of work that spans for miles.” Daisy’s reflection illustrates the point of public art. The point of public art is to challenge and stretch the imagination of the public.  Like Daisy states, public art gives us something to think about. 

Author: Brenda Mitchell
Posted date: Thursday, October 13, 2011 3:20:19 AM EDT
Last modified date: Thursday, October 13, 2011 3:20:19 AM EDT
Total views: 33  Your views: 8 Next Post ›

What is Public Art?
What is public art?  Public art is many things to the observer; however a common thread that exists among observers of public art. The common thread is the observers’ uncanny inability to re-frame from being emotionally affected by some facet of the artwork. Public art is a source of peace for some people and intrusive to others.  The moment people emerge from the privacy of their home, they are greeted with some type of public art. As a child I considered the Twin Towers in New York City to be a public monument to twins everywhere. When I looked at the Twin Towers I saw art which represented the unique relationship only twins can experience. Some people viewed the Twin Towers as major contributors to Manhattan’s skyline. Others may have viewed the Twin Towers as two buildings blocking the view they had prior to their construction in 1971.  Some people failed to realize the gift of art these buildings gave to the public every day of the year, rain or shine, until they ceased to exist.  Public art is the constant companion that can be relied upon to greet the public in any season. Public art is reliable, it’s in the same place, at the right time with a unique message for every observer.  
Public art is Mount Rushmore, it’s the Status of Liberty, and it’s murals in cities throughout America. Public art is the gravestones lined with precision in Arlington National Cemetery and children shoes hanging from electrical wires in urban cities informing the public that a young life was tragically taken in gang warfare. Public art exudes power that causes people to think and at times causes people to react. Public art has been a companion of humankind since the beginning of humankind. 
What is public art? Public art reflects the society of humankind.
Brenda Mitchell – 10.13.2011


Response:
I like your perspective about the Twin Towers. I never thought of them in such a simplistic way that makes them almost personal. Nice. I also like how you spoke on public art and that it in itself a constant that can be relied on.  I feel like a lot of public art is NOT a permanent thing that will be there for a long time. I grew up in San Francisco and I love graffiti so I would always keep my out for cool pieces of writing or pictures.  For a long time there was this blue dog that was painted around downtown and I remember being disappointed when it was no longer there. 
Brenda,At the risk of appearing ignorant I must admit that I was unaware of the significance of children's shoes hanging from electrical wires. It saddens me to learn that it is a pronouncement that a young life has been taken by gang warfare. However, I'm glad you offered it as an example because, despite its terrible message, it can still be considered public art. Public art is not always celebratory; in fact, it is often somber or cautionary. As you said, public art reflects human society. There is good and bad.
I loved your comments on the twin towers. I think the fact that you interpreted them so uniquely as not just buildings but entities that bore a special relationship to one another speaks to a certain level of thoughtfulness. Urban structures became art in your mind, while others may have had no such awareness. Public art, like all art, is open to interpretation and may sometimes go unnoticed. Or, that which was not necessarily put forth as public art may be interpreted as public art.

Discussion Board conversations on Public Art

After viewing slides provided by Harold Beaulieu, Vallejo Muralist

Author: Masom Mrema
Date: Saturday, October 22, 2011 3:02:18 AM EDT
Subject: What is the point of public art? 

Public art caheighten economic value. Data strongly suggests that cities with an active and dynamic cultural scene are more attractive to individuals and businesses. This is evident in some cities in the bay area such as Oakland and San Francisco. These cities have more people and business than others in the bay area because of  the aesthetic value of  public art. Some of these pieces of art reflect lives, cultures, and beliefs of people in the communities. As the result, more and more people are relocating to such cities because they feel a sense of belonging.

Public art engages people in social interaction. Strangers would engage in conversation; children would ask questions. It becomes a place that we can educate each other, and enhance our knowledge, learning new things and passing on to the next generation.

Public art offers peace in community. there are some cities that have past history of violence. By embedding a piece of art, that delineate piece, can help to reduce violence and make people feel calmer and more relaxed.

 

Response:

 

Masomi’s perspective on what is the point of public art is interesting and trueCities that embrace art as a part of their image are viewed by surrounding cities as progressive, liberal and urbane A city with this type of brand image typically attracts people who are culturally diverse and engenders pride in the residents. I agree with Masomi, public art can bring to a city a sense of belonging and community. 

 

Author: Karen Gong
Date: Thursday, October 20, 2011 5:22:49 PM EDT
Subject: Slideshow discussion essay 

What is public art? Is it art or is it creativity? What is the point of public art?

Public art to me is the community’s creative expressions. I found this quote and I agree with the point of view"If done right, public art creates a sense of commonality for a community; pride and ownership of the neighborhood, cohesion of purpose and a starting point to join together to address larger issues. (Art) creates shared public space/experience."

When I looked through Harold Beaulieu’s slide show, I saw a theme of shared community and experience. There were numerous murals shown and I imagined many people contributing to them. The stories he related of how a town painted a mural in a day reminded me of that. I loved seeing the school murals with the kids modeling their silhouettes.

I laughed at seeing the monasteries built on a mountain. I had never thought of these as public pieces of art. My parents visited these medieval monasteries in Europe and brough back books and pictures of them. They were beautiful and fascinating places. In order to enter some of these monasteries, one had to be transported in a pulley system. It’s function was to protect the inhabitants from invaders The functionality of the place made for a beautiful form. It got me to thinking of buildings, bridges and architecture as art pieces. They are not only beautiful but each serve a purpose, to shelter, connect, and structurally hold a place up.

Art is creativity. It makes us think beyond the physical and gives meaning and depth to our imagination. There was a mural of a man with a bandanna who seemed to be throwing a Molotov cocktail to start a fire in a building or store. The cocktail was replaced with a bouquet of flowers. This affected me so much. Imagine if the spread of violence was exchanged with the spread of peace and love. It sounds corny but, that image expanded my mind in that direction. It was both quiet and disturbing. The image expressed this deep meaning to me better than any person’s words.

Karen Gong 10/19/11

Karen,

I can definitely relate to what you said about the image being both "quiet and disturbing". I think that often, art has a pulse that words cannot find.  As in the work you described, art can have the effect of spurring us to action and bettering us in many ways, without speaking a single wordArt shows us wrong and right at once and confronts us with a choice. No matter what we chooseart remainand remind us that there are greater implications of the things we do.

 

 

Author: Erin O'Brien
Date: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 10:07:57 PM EDT
Subject: What is the point of public art? 

Throughout the body of work presented in Harold's cd, the common thread uniting all public art seemed invariably to be its purpose. Public art is fundamentally by the people and for the people. Its concept is unique in that it is put forth according to the needs of expression felt by a particular community at a particular time. Public art marks social progress, but individual progress as well. Present in many of the works presented by Harold was an overwhelming sentiment that one individual's decisions can impact an entire community. Public art magnifies the responsibility that communities have to one another, and to themselves. Public art is a report on the health of any given community at any given time. In our communities, the voice that is spoken by many yet heard by few is prominently displayed in public art.

Public art is the proverbial watchdog that reminds us our acts are not unnoticed. Public art is the community guardian silently sanctioning poor behavior and holdig up those who do right. In many ways public art may be a public ideal; what we hope to be and what we strive to perpetuate seem omnipresent in public art. Public art is what we know our communities are capable of. Sometimes they're capable of good, other times they're capable of bad.

It is my impression that public art is a way to forever publish and encapsulate a given period in time. It is a fingerprint of all that we took pride in, all that we accomplished, and all that we hoped for. Public art in the present gives us something to reach for, public art in the future gives us something to remember by.

Importantly, public art is a way to bring communities together. Communities may initially unite in an evaluative spirit; determining the myriad ways that they are. This initial evaluation, this exercise, is the powerful spirit behind public art. Public art moves us because it is not from a single artist; it is many voices speaking as one. Therefore public art seems to compel us to greater social responsibility.

One of my favorite works from this collection was a wonderful mural, the text of which read: "Fix our eyes, not on what is seen but what is unseen, for what is seen is temporary... but what is unseeneternal."

The message here is empowering, compelling. It is evident to me that this art is a guardian for the community in which it is displayed. Those who do wrong can take meaning from it. Those who do right can take meaning from it. Those who are silent victims can certainly take meaning from it, and indeed, refuge. Public art is at once a celebration of a community's good and a commitment to eradicating a community's bad. It is a policing power as much as it is a statement of worth and purpose. And that is the point, or purpose.

I agree with what you have said about public art : " public art is the way to bring people together". Since people are coming from different backgrounds, public art can be used to educate communitieabout other cultures, food, language, and more. If people, from different background, learfrom each from each other, they would feel comfortablamid each other.

 

Response:

I agree that art marks a space in time and records our accomplishments and hopes. I like the image you mentioned about many voices speaking as one.

The text you mentioned what is unseen being eternal is part of my favorite bible verse.

The last messagyou mentioned that art is very subjective and has different meaning to different people is very true. The same piece can inspire, console, and disturb. Art is very powerful that way

Top of Form

Author: Katharine Jolda
Date: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 8:19:50 PM EDT
Subject: art and creativity 

Traveling around the country, I have encountered a huge range of public art. There are the famous Alexander Calder and Marc Chagall creations in Chicago, wild graffiti on trains and subway cars, passionately painted murals along alleyways, whimsical knitwear for bike racks and stop signs, an mythic and patriotic beings cast in bronze.

I believe art and creativity have the same roots. One can look into the etymology and find root associations of the making of something by skill and craft. We use “creative” in a funny way: He is so creative. Create-ive, to mean something like “uniquely expressive.”

 We create things all the time without being mindful of it, so art may be “skillful expression done with self-awareness” and the intention of communicating something to others. These days, arts seems to refer to increasingly conceptual creative work, whereas in earlier eras art was more skill-based and, in classical European fine arts, representative of the events of the time.

 Another change from earlier eras to contemporary art has been the concept of individuality in expression. Perhaps people feel strong urges to declare their unique identity as a contrast to a growing and broadening social group wherein individual relationships are easily overwhelmed by representative and group dynamics. It is striking to go to an exhibition of ancient art and see so many works from an ethnic group or a nation, and though the works were individually made by different people, the style can be exactly the same. First it is “Japanese watercolor from the 17th century” or a “traditional Navajo rug;” later we know the artists to be Yojo and Roberta Blackgoat.

 This movement of individuality has parallels with public murals, as those often mark the presence of a community that is not well represented in dominant public spheres or policy values. Municipally sponsored public art often goes through a long process of collaboration, design, and approval by all community stakeholders. While this is done with good intentions, this can lead to the illusion that we should always seek consensus, which is increasingly difficult as the community grows in numberI believe art should be a non-verbal dialog, each creation as a statement or rebuttaland we should not expect one piece to summarize the whole.

 I like public art that tells a story of its place and provides an opportunity for people to feel part of that story. One of my favorite childhood memories is of a large mural under a freeway overpass that had the images of dozens of Oakland’s citizen heroes. My parents took care to know each person represented in this mural, and each time we walked past it, they would tell my sister and me about one of the people there

Wow Katharine, I'm impressed with your thorough description of art and creativity. Interesting point about illusion of consensus.  I like that you said it's important for us to remember that one piece cannot represent or summarize the whole.

Subject: RE: art and creativity  

  

Bottom of Form


KatherineI do also like a public art that tells a story of its place! I grew up in a place surrounded with arts. You could not pass a mile without seeing a piece of art. I remember we used to travel periodically to my mother's and my father's village. There was a piece of public art in every town of each village. Each village had at least ten tribes. And each tribe spoke different dialect. The only way you coullearn about each tribe was through a piece of  public art. These pieces public arts were very informative. They depict the history of the place, the culture, religion and, dialect. Consequently, people who visits villages can learn a lot about the villagervia theipublic art.

 

                                                                                                               

 

Author: Daisy Wiener
Date: Wednesday, October 19, 2011 2:41:23 PM EDT
Subject: What is the point of public art? 

Public art can take numerous forms and can be truly any size from something on the top of a pin to a piece of work that spans for miles.  I remember when I was young and living in rural Sonoma County that there was this white fence made out of material that an artist had done and it went on and on. I think it spanned across many counties but it was a long time ago so I can't remember exactly . I do remember this white flowing fence going across fields and up and over the hills and valleys, it was really cool looking.  I think that same artist did many huge pieces of art including wrapping some islands in the tropics with pink material, making them look like enormous lily pads. I'm a big fan of public art because it gives people something to think about.  I especially love street art like graffiti and pieces placed in random places.  I live in Petaluma and a couple years ago there were little old fashioned cars that were auctioned off for a fundraiser that people painted anyway they wanted and then they were placed in different places in town, very cute.  I love the hearts in San Francisco. They were also used as a fund raiser and they are these big ceramic hearts that are placed throughout the city that people painted in all kinds of ways. I love that public art is just that, art out in public made for all to see.  It's a beautiful thing and we are all lucky to get ideas and be inspired by others work.

My imagination is activated by the image Daisy paints with her first sentence “public art can take numerous forms and can be truly any size from something on the top of a pin to a piece of work that spans for miles.” Daisy’s reflection illustrates the point of public art. The point of public art is to challenge and stretch the imagination of the public Like Daisy states, public art gives us something to think about. 

 

Author: Brenda Mitchell
Posted date: Thursday, October 13, 2011 3:20:19 AM EDT
Last modified date: Thursday, October 13, 2011 3:20:19 AM EDT
Total views: 33  Your views: 8

     

What is Public Art?

What is public art?  Public art is many things to the observer; however a common thread that exists among observers of public art. The common thread is the observers’ uncanny inability to re-frame from being emotionally affected by some facet of the artwork. Public art is a source of peace for some people and intrusive to others The moment people emerge from the privacy of their home, they are greeted with some type of public art. As a child I considered the Twin Towers in New York City to be a public monument to twins everywhereWhen I looked at the Twin Towers I saw art which represented the unique relationship only twins can experienceSome people viewed the Twin Towers as major contributors to Manhattan’s skyline. Others may have viewed the Twin Towers as two buildings blocking the view they had prior to their construction in 1971 Some people failed to realize the gift of art these buildings gave to the public every day of the year, rain or shine, until they ceased to exist.  Public art is the constant companion that can be relied upon to greet the public in any seasonPublic art is reliable, it’s in the same place, at the right time with a unique message for every observer 

Public art is Mount Rushmore, it’s the Status of Liberty, and it’s murals in cities throughout America. Public art is the gravestones lined with precision in Arlington National Cemetery and children shoes hanging from electrical wires in urban cities informing the public that a young life was tragically taken in gang warfare. Public art exudes power that causes people to think and at times causes people to react. Public art has been a companion of humankind since the beginning of humankind. 

What is public art? Public art reflects the society of humankind.

Brenda Mitchell – 10.13.2011

 

Response:

I like your perspective about the Twin Towers. I never thought of them in such a simplistic way that makes them almost personal. Nice. I also like how you spoke on public art and that it in itself a constant that can be relied on.  I feel like a lot of public art is NOT a permanent thing that will be there for a long time. I grew up in San Francisco and I love graffiti so I would always keep my out for cool pieces of writing or pictures.  For a long time there was this blue dog that was painted around downtown and I remember being disappointed when it was no longer there. 

Brenda,At the risk of appearing ignorant I must admit that I was unaware of the significance of children's shoes hanging from electrical wires. It saddens me to learn that it is a pronouncement that a young life has been taken by gang warfare. However, I'm glad you offered it as an example because, despite its terrible message, it can still be considered public art. Public art is not always celebratory; in fact, it is often somber or cautionary. As you said, public art reflects human society. There is good and bad.

I loved your comments on the twin towers. I think the fact that you interpreted them so uniquely as not just buildings but entities that bore a special relationship to one another speaks to a certain level of thoughtfulness. Urban structures became art in your mind, while others may have had no such awareness. Public art, like all art, is open to interpretation and may sometimes go unnoticed. Or, that which was not necessarily put forth as public art may be interpreted as public art.